Characteristics Of Seventeenth Century England Essay

692 words - 3 pages

Population growth, inflation, commercialization, individual competitiveness, and social
Divergences are just some of the many words used to describe the future of England’s society during the seventeenth century. It seemed that humanities only goal was to become a business tycoon and hit the big time. These however were not words or used to describe the Puritans.
Some Puritans of this time did not like the sound of their ever nearing future and believed it was not in god’s will for these things to happen. Therefore they grouped together in order to make a new, pure model society in the area of New England in America. The Puritans simply did not agree to what was happening to their religion in their homeland so they set off for a fresh start.
Their aspirations for the New World were to create a life that would be material, but not threaten
their spiritual goals, give the rest the Puritan world a model district to live by, and to live as saintly
as possible in order to receive an all paid pass to heaven. Their aspirations to do this were met
to a fairly good extent for the first few generations of this communal experiment in their new homes.
To begin with, the Puritans were not searching for a society in which they were the top nor the bottom of the totem pole. They simply wanted to be middle class citizens, and live comfortably among others; virtually eliminating the competitiveness of their current society. To achieve this, most of the settlers made honest livings, doing something such as being an artisan or a farmer. The unfinicky Puritans found that the easiest way to keep their spirituality was by being in the new world and working middle-class life styles. This method of thinking of course was passed on to these generations’ children, proving that their determination to live uncomplicated and holy lives was achieved for the most part. As a puritan, one is supposed...

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