The Character Of Jay Gatsby From The Great Gatsby

760 words - 3 pages

The Character of Jay Gatsby from The Great Gatsby

Time tells us that success often comes with a price. Often money will create more problems than it can solve. The richness of a person’s soul can be hidden in the folds of money. Such is the case of Jay Gatsby. Jay Gatsby is constantly altering in the readers mind due to the various puzzling events that transpire in the novel creating a level of mystery.
First off, Gatsby is a man who feels secure in his privacy and allows very few people into his personal life due to lack of trust. Jay often throws parties at his lavish house, only to shrink away from contact with his various guests that frolic in his privately funded bashes. He does not drink, mainly because he has a high level of composure that cannot be compromised by the effects of alcohol. When the narrator, Nick Carraway, is allowed to venture into Gatsby’s personal life Gatsby tells Nick only what he feels is necessary to keep him from being suspicious. The eerie thing about this is that while doing this he is so guarded that Nick often questions how concrete and truthful the information is. When discussing his past Gastby is choppy and uncomfortable telling Nick about his education and war experiences. Only when Gatsby produces a metal of valor earned in the war does Nick believe in his war service stories. Even then Nick has a hard time believing Gatsby’s educational background because of his uncomfortable declaration that he attended Oxford, a very prestigious English university. Trust is not a strong point of Gastby’s makeup and lifestyle.
Therefore, when looking at Gatsby’s most impressive traits one thing that pops up is his energetic smile, vibrant personality, and loyalty to those who he respects or cares about. It is important to mention the fact that Gatsby always seemed to make every person feel important and at ease while conversing with him. It was his nature to express courtesy to any guest he came in contact with, no matter how insignificant they were or what their occupation was. As far as loyalty is...

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