The Theme Of Failure In Ibsen's A Doll's House, In Sorrow's Kitchen: The Life And Folklore Of Zora Neale Hurston, And The Novel True Notebooks

920 words - 4 pages

Failure is one aspect of life that no one can avoid. The terror that comes from failure is that it has the power to break someone down to where they feel they can not get up and overcome the situation. Failing at a situation seems to make all hard work vanish in an instant, as if all the time and effort that was put forth into succeeding was never even there. Although failure can hurt and cause anxiety and even depression, it also allows a person to discover that even though they have been crushed they can still conquer it and succeed in the end.
In A Doll House by Henrik Ibsen, failure was a common theme. One of the biggest failures of the play is Nora and Torvald’s inability to change themselves to make their marriage work. At the end of the play, desperate for answers, Torvald asks Nora to, “Tell [him] the greatest miracle!” (Ibsen 944). Nora responds telling Torvald, “You and I both would have to transform ourselves to the point that—that our living together could be a true marriage” (Ibsen 944). Nora and Torvald failed at the task of changing themselves in order for them to stay together and create a real and sincere marriage. The reason for the failure was that there was only one person in the marriage, which was Torvald. Torvald was the one who was constantly controlling Nora and treating her like a doll. He felt that Nora was only a childish woman who didn’t know anything about the outside world. The only way that the marriage could have succeeded was if the two were willing to put forth the time and effort. Nora deciding to leave is the effect of this failure. Now her children will be forced to live without their mother and Torvald will have to learn to cope with people of the society talking about him and his family life. On the other hand, if Nora decided to stay with Torvald and work on their marriage, Nora would have never known what it was like to be independent and not to rely on someone else. She would have lived life thinking that she needed someone to help her every second of every day. But because she did leave she has the strength to triumph through any situation life throws at her.
In Sorrow’s Kitchen: The Life and Folklore of Zora Neale Hurston by Mary E. Lyons, describes the disintegrated friendship of Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes. Hurston failed in being a truthful person and caused the demise of her friendship with Hughes. The friendship ended when she decided to send a play she and Hughes had co-written together, with only her name on the copyright. In return,...

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