The Philosophy Of Existentialism Essay

1015 words - 4 pages

‘The most dangerous follower is he whose defection would destroy the whole party: that is to say, the best follower.’ – Friedrich Nietzsche
Being recognizable and distinctive nowadays is something most individuals seek after. To become important or standing out in any community is not something today’s individuals have created or whatsoever! Ever since the twentieth century and even before, that belief and eagerness to prove your existence has been noticeably present. Not only between common people has this been there, also philosophers had sincerely thought about that humanly keenness to prove that one is different and essential, and tried to philosophically explain it.

The term used for that theory is existentialism; as explained by the significant philosophers at that time it’s referred to as “the explicit conceptual manifestation of an existential attitude". Which is basically people trying to prove their existence and significance in the world. This is not only through the thinking of humans; it is also the acting, feeling and living ways that distinguish them from others.

This philosophy argues that individuals are supposed to be free to choose the rules by which they would like to live their lives; however consequences of their choices should be fully accepted by them afterwards. One gives his own life meaning through his positive actions; by all means, life has no value unless the person himself gives it value!!

Although some might argue that Existentialism goes back to the times of Socrates –‘one should know thy self’ - , the Existentialistic ideas mainly started becoming famous at a time of great despair and depression, which followed the Great Depression and World War II. Societies were so fed up and unhappy, that any tiny bits of light would have made them optimistic. It is very noticeable that philosophers who were greatly interested in that belief and kept developing it were ones that were touched by the wars and conflicts at that time. Another observation is that most of these philosophers were either religious moralists (a philosopher who specializes in moral issues related to religion), agnostic relativists (who are people that believe the existence of a higher power can’t be proven or disproven, as well as believe that some elements of experience are relative in terms of what they depend on, for example), or the last and most common type are amoral atheists (who are people that don’t believe in the existence of a higher god, however don’t have their own sets of morals and ethics that they follow).

This, we can most clearly regard in the two most famous philosophers of the 19th century that have been one of the first; Søren Kierkegaard and Friedrich Nietzsche. Later on during the 20th century, Martin Heidegger (a German philosopher) influenced other existentialist philosophers like Albert Camus, Sartre, and Simone de Beauvoir. Kierkegaard, the Danish philosopher, was a religious philosopher that believed in god...

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