The Divine Command Theories Essay

1069 words - 5 pages

Being able to tell what is right and wrong seems like it would be fairly easy to do. It seems as when we’re born it’s imbedded in us to distinguish between what is considered to be wrong and what’s considered to be right. From childhood most people are taught not to steal, lie, and cheat but does that make it right to do so if we’re put in a situation where one of those would be right to do or if we learned if those thing are considered wrong. There are many theories that state what we should define as wrong and what is ethical and unethical and the Divine Command theory breaks this down for us in different theories which many societies have looked upon for years .The Divine Command Theory ...view middle of the document...

This is one of the main criticisms that this theory faces if you think it’s wrong to not have stopped the guy from hitting the young teen but if someone else believes it wasn’t wrong than who is right. There are always two views with every situation and not everyone thinks alike so it is really hard to support this theory.
Even more important imagine if there was a rule that protected children from being abused but only if they didn’t deserve the abuse and if it’s harming them would you pass this law? If you said no than you aren’t following the Utilitarianism view because that wouldn’t help the majority of the kids who are being abused. Utilitarianism states that whichever choice brings the most happiness should be the one you agree with. But that doesn’t seem right does it? What about all the other children who wouldn’t fall under this category which excludes them, wouldn’t that seem wrong?. Utilitarianism which is a form of consequentialism, and say that those actions are right only if it brings out the good overall which also can be put as what brings the most happiness of all that is affected by it, it being the situation you are in. The fact that Bentham believes this theory is all about pleasure and pain really says something, not that you are bringing pleasure to yourself but to other people in a sense. Conversely it is very hard to put someone else’s interest over your own, so how would this theory work. Also, it’s difficult to keep enforcing morality or punishing people, which in reality would turn this situation from being about happiness to unhappiness. Likewise, there is also too many outcomes that could happen with any given situation to think about what would be the best way to bring the ultimate happiness to a being.
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