The Civil Rights Movement In The 1960’s

1336 words - 5 pages


African Americans have been struggling for equality for many decades. It only seems that during the 1960?s is when there were actual significant advances made. This was about the same time that civil rights came into the political scene. Throughout the South, Blacks were still in the majority, but had no political power what so ever. The Civil Rights Movement gave African Americans a voice and a chance to make a difference. The 1960's helped open up hope and expectations for Black Americans.

One of the most prominent men of his time, Martin Luther King Jr. was known as ?A national hero and a civil rights figure of growing importance? (Discovering 1). ?Martin Luther King Jr. aroused whites and blacks to protest racial discrimination, poverty and war? (Compton?s 244). On August 28, 1963 King made one of his most influential speeches ever at the March on Washington. His ?I have a dream? speech had a major impact on all of America. His speech urged people to be judged by their character and not by the color of their skin (Civil Rights 148). King was a man who didn?t believe in violence. The way he got his point across was not through violence, but through peaceful protest just as Gandhi had done. Martin Luther organized sit-ins, marches and boycotts. This was otherwise known as civil disobedience. King believed that it was now time to end segregation and discrimination in the South and throughout the entire country (Civil Rights 84). King helped bring together many blacks that were looking for peaceful solutions to racial oppression in the United States. King became the youngest man ever to win the Nobel peace prize in 1964. Another young man who fought for civil rights was Malcolm X. Otherwise known as X, he was the opposite of King. Instead of peaceful protest, he chose to meet violence with violence. Martin Luther King Jr. wanted to fight racism with love and Malcolm X wanted blacks to fight back when they were attacked. ?He was one of the most fiery and controversial blacks of the twentieth century? (Discovering 1). ?Malcolm X, was regarded as personifying black nationalism? (Civil 117). ?Malcolm was known for his incisive analysis on the problems of American democracy and the limitations of the intergrationalist Civil Rights Movement? (Civil 116). He believed that black men must reject Western society standards and develop their own society and ethical standards (Colliers 143). He established the Organization of Afro-American Unity. He did this in order to try to unify all the black organizations by fighting white racism (Colliers 143). Malcolm wanted to inform blacks about the cultures that had been taken away from them and the self-hatred the whites had inspired (Discovering 1). He wanted to point them to a better way of life. ?The black power movement to instill pride and a sense of self reliance in the African American community? (Compton's 132).

Many organizations helped to throughout the Civil Rights...

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