The Americans With Disabilities Act (Ada): A Good Start

1177 words - 5 pages

“Open your mouth for the mute, for the rights of all who are destitute. Open your mouth, judge righteously, defend the rights of the poor and needy.” (Proverbs 31:8-9).

Prejudices exist in every measure, against every person, and everywhere across the world. People are inclined to judge without reason, and often hold conviction to the initial judgment made. Despite worldwide attempts to decrease these preconceptions, people must suffer through being the target on very frequent occasions. In the U.S., occurred the Civil Rights Movement as well as the movement to end Women’s Suffrage. This did not eliminate all biases against those groups, nor did the Americans with Disabilities Act. People are still isolated because of physical differences, such as disabilities. Some people may disagree, but the ways to victimize are more abundant than just abusive treatment. These ways include the constant evasion of a person, the exclusion of someone from some activity, as well as the change in manner towards them. These seem to be the most common responses for people with disabilities to receive. In fact, people who have disabilities may face the most discrimination by use of these types of oppressions.

Within countless conversations exists the term normal. Normalcy is a standard by which people determine whether others have positive or negative peculiarities. The term different is as commonly used, but when something is different from the normal, it has a challenging time being accepted. Unfortunately, those with disabilities are not ordinarily encompassed in the idea of what is normal. Thus, individuals who have disabilities are trapped in a “normal world,” a “normal world” where they must endure the impatience, ignorance, insensitivity, impoliteness of “normal” people (“People With Disabilities”). Astonishingly, the foulest of it all isn’t even other people. Those with disabilities have to accept their lives as being deprived of some joyful instances that may never happen. Individuals with handicaps may not be able to be active with their (or other’s) children, dream jobs may not be within grasp, memories may not be accessible while other’s take them for granted and shun those who desire that which they’ve already acquired (“People With Disabilities”). Provided, life is hard with a disability but additionally, those with handicaps must suffer isolation which is unfavorable in multiple ways. With isolation the person has no help, no support, no companionship, and feel ultimately rejected shutting them down in a social manner (“People With Disabilities”).

People who suffer from the difficulties of having a disability as well as being discriminated against may have complications managing. In daily life, individuals seek the approval, acceptance, and companionship of their peers; those with disabilities are no different in what they seek. Therefore, being out casted can have very disturbing conclusions. A woman and her daughter...

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