Similarities And Differences In Shirley Johnson's The Lottery And Hernando Tellez' "Just Lather, That's All"

597 words - 2 pages

The short stories “The Lottery” by Shirley Johnson and “Just lather, that’s all” by Hernando Tellez both portray similar situations even though they are two entirely different stories. The two stories both illustrate human feelings and behaviors mostly in reference to fear, violence, unfairness and pride. These two stories, even though they have some things in common, still have some differences and represent some ideas in different fashions. The similarities and differences between these stories have been critically reviewed and will be discussed in the essay.
The two stories are both centered on a particular person in the story. “The Lottery” was centered round Tessie Hutchinsen who happened to be the unlucky one to have picked the marked paper and had to be stoned to death. Tessie was at that period, the only one who saw the unfairness of the situation. She screams, “It isn't fair, it isn't right,” as they stone her. It was in this same manner that the barber viewed the colonel’s actions as being unfair. “How many of us had he ordered shot? How many of us had he ordered mutilated? It was better not to think about it. ”, the barber thought. This shows his concern for Torres’s deeds. In “Just Lather, That’s All”, as well as “The Lottery” we can view unfairness from a particular person’s perspective.
The violence, as well as cruelty in the two stories is seen from the way Captain Torres treated his prisoners in “Just Lather, That’s All” and also from the way the members of the community treated themselves in “The Lottery” with no sense of publicized guilt or conscience. Captain Torres was a murderer who did not care about the way he brutally killed his prisoners. Even from the barber’s conversation with him,...

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