Randomness With Influence From God: William Bradford And The Puritan Movement

716 words - 3 pages

Language is the universal means by which man has communicated and conversed for thousands of years. Language is deeply rooted in entertaining via storytelling; however, also in the church. One principle thought of the Puritans was that most of the happenings are connected to God. This mindset is not very logical according to today’s standards but were a common belief during the 17th century. Religious explanation for earthly events is very prevalent in William Bradford’s writings. Are these events only sudden freak events that occur or are they really interference from a higher being?
Deaths in the 17th century were common occurrences, but when a health hearty seaman dies suddenly Bradford is suspect. Earlier in the voyage, this same “lusty” seaman was criticizing the seasick passengers. The seaman even threatened harsh decisions such as just throwing the sick travelers overboard to clear out some of the human cargo on the boat. He was overruled by the crew thankfully; however continued to curse often and distastefully. His untimely sickness and soon death was in Bradford’s words, “the just hand of God upon him.” (line 3-4 p. 60) This situational irony is comical because this lusty, able bodied seaman was one day complaining and insulting the ailing passengers then suddenly getting sick and coming quickly to the end of this time on Earth. In today’s society, this event would not necessarily be seen as revenge from God, but possibly a rare disease or possibly a tumor of some sort making him moody and aggressive. Whether or not this was God’s punishment or just a consequence is still a mystery, yet Bradford’s Puritain beliefs left him with no confusion.
Further on the journey, a young man by the name of John Howland was almost killed by the sea. He was above deck during a strong storm then the boat hit a wave, launching him into the air. He would have been taken by the sea if he had not caught ahold of a small pole. He held his grip until the other men could safely retrieve him from the waters edge. Bradford said, “it pleased God,” (pg. 60) that he did...

Find Another Essay On Randomness with Influence from God: William Bradford and the Puritan Movement

The Literary Use of Religion by John Smith and William Bradford

689 words - 3 pages motivation to use religion by these two authors, yet the use is still prevalent in their writings. The reasons for these similarities and differences are found in the greater interest of each individual author. John Smith and William Bradford use divine guidance as an explanation for the reasons of their journeys. Smith uses the providence of God to justify his placement at Jamestown. Smith writes in “The General History of Virginia”: “But God the

Compare and contrast the writing styles of William Byrd to William Bradford based on style, tone, and purpose

872 words - 3 pages Writers are characterized by three factors. These factors are style, tone, and purpose. William Byrd and William Bradford were two colonial writers however they took completely opposite approaches toward writing. During these times, journals, diaries, and sermons made up the literature. Byrd and Bradford were no exceptions with their works of A History of the Dividing Line and Of Plymouth Plantation respectively. Whether it was the difference in

The Puritan Religion’s Influence on Children

1715 words - 7 pages While the current child considers their life to be stressful and busy, the children of the Puritan religion had much more to be worried about, on top of all of their daily activities. The adults in the community looked down upon the children that represented the devil and his works. Children were born with the burden of Adam’s sin, and they must be broken from sinning. By the time that the children were five, they were put to work, to

The Influence of Light on Chloroplast Development and Movement

3338 words - 13 pages been shown that a short pulse of blue light is enough to induce chloroplast movement in subsequent darkness in the seed plant Lemna trisulca indicating that information from light perception can be retained in the irradiated area for some time [17]. Furthermore, sequential irradiation of the same area with blue and red both at fluence rates below the threshold for the accumulation response can also induce the accumulation

The Abolitionist Movement of 1830 and William Lloyd Garrison

824 words - 4 pages South. The abolishment of slavery was not an overnight occurrence and many events led to the increase of support to do away with slavery. Even though the preceding events before the abolitionist movement of 1830 did have support, they only had a minority and did not connect the nation as a whole like the revolution did. The revolution of 1830 had a greater impression on the entire nation than the movements prior to 1830 because of William Lloyd Garrison and the various ways he transformed abolition, the influence of black abolitionists, and the advent of abolitionist politics.

Isolation, hydrolysis and characterization of casein from non-fat milk and protein analysis using Bradford method

3769 words - 15 pages wherein the α-amino acid undergoes oxidative decarboxylation producing CO2, NH3 and aldehyde with one less carbon atom than the parent amino acid. The blue color produced is from the reaction of the reduced ninhydrin with the liberated ammonia and one molecule of ninhydrin. Another test used to determine a protein is using the Bradford method. It is used to quantify proteins. This method is much simpler, faster, more sensitive, and is

The Influence of The Black Arts Movement

1827 words - 8 pages of their social responsibility and influence in the African-American community. The range of the views held by those of the Black Arts Movement varied significantly from the social function of African-American art to a more narrow perspective of what it means to be a black individual and or writer. A great deal of the work created at this time was very opinionated and designed to empower and uplift African-Americans. The movement holds a

Influence of the Black Arts Movement

903 words - 4 pages that white individuals were to be stripped of their entitlement to prohibit or characterize dark character, white stylish benchmarks were to be ousted and swapped with innovative qualities emerging from the dark group. The Black Arts Movement (BAM), 1965 to 1976, started in Harlem, New York, was an influential movement for various reasons. The movement is characterized as a set of perspectives about African American cultural making, which

Influence of the Media in the Anti-War Movement of the 60's and 70's

2121 words - 8 pages , and disillusionment with the powerlessness of the antiwar movement. By 1967, it became even clearer that the practices of the Diem regime with the support of American aid, had suppressed religious freedom in Southern Vietnam. The results of the national opinion polls from 1967 was startling; the war’s cost in American lives and resources had surmounted, which prompted the participation of the elite class in the antiwar movement. The clergy

Assess the importance of the British Documentary Movement and its influence on 'realism' within British Cinema

565 words - 2 pages praise by The Home Planning Sub-Committee in May 1939: 'Its success has been considerable and warrants serious consideration of the story form in representing government propaganda'.Cavalcanti was one of the documentary filmmakers employed by Michael Balcon at Ealing Studios, ensuring that the Documentary Film Movement would influence British Cinema in terms of personnel as well as aesthetic form. Balcon believed Ealing could make a serious

Abolitionist Movement and William Lloyd Garrison

725 words - 3 pages leading figure emerged and his name was William Lloyd Garrison. He began an abolitionist movement that really changed the nation as a whole. The movement that occurred before the 1830s had no real effect on the nation as a whole. The concept was centered on colonization. They were trying to get the freed African Americans to move to Africa or the Caribbean’s. They created the American Colonization Society, which challenged slavery without challenging

Similar Essays

The Christian Influence. Puritan Influence On Native Americans In History With William Apess As Prime Example. No Work Cited Page Is Included; Has In Text Citations And Is Written In Mla Format

1127 words - 5 pages CONTROVERSY, THAT MANY CHILDREN HAVE MANIFESTED A STRENGTH OF INTELLECT FAR ABOVE THEIR YEARS AND HAVE GIVEN AMPLE EVIDENCE OF A GOOD WORK OF GRACE MANIFEST BY THE INFLUENCE OF THE SPIRIT OF GOD IN THE YOUNG AND TENDER MINDS. BUT THIS IS PERHAPS ATTRIBUTABLE TO THE CARE AND ATTENTION BESTOWED UPON THEM.One cannot get more Puritan in thought. The Puritans believed wholeheartedly that one was born into sin and should spend the rest of his or her

The Puritan Movement Essay

908 words - 4 pages briefly examine some of the causes and conditions which led to the Puritan migration of 1620, while also observing the distinctions which set them apart from their contemporary counterparts. The Conditions It is thought that the Puritan movement first began to organize, into what we would recognize today, sometime in the 1560s under the reign of Queen Elizabeth. However its roots can be traced back all the way to William Tyndale, who is

William Bradford And Thomas Morton Essay

1563 words - 6 pages In the New World Bradford and Morton were both important men of our history. The stories of both great men give us an insight into the way religion and influence affected Puritan life. William Bradford said he believed, “Plymouth people were the chosen people to live out their last days in the earthly church” (Daly pg 560). Puritan settlers came to the new world seeking a better life and to get away from the rule of the Catholic Church they

The Randomness Of Love And Baseball

749 words - 3 pages The Randomness of Love and Baseball Generally the terms love, baseball, immigration, and poetry are not mentioned within the same text. However, according to Andrei Codrescu, author of the essay "A Kind of Love", all these subjects are related. The only problem is that Codrescu fails to make these connections obvious to his audience. He also fails in making the purpose of his essay known and therefore is unsuccessful in whatever goal he intended