Emily Bronte's "Wuthering Heights" Essay

1369 words - 6 pages

Through chapters 4 to 7 in Emily Bronte's, Wuthering Heights, Heathcliff and Catherine's characters are developed, from when they are children and inseparable to when they are adults and have to live with the pain and anguish of living separate lives where they cannot be together. The love they share is one of great passion, that is both unexplainable and all time and energy consuming for both.Heathcliff is introduced to the Earnshaw household and the plot as a young orpahn boy plucked off the streets by Mr. Earnshaw on his way home from Liverpool. Heathcliff is immediately abhorred by his new family. He is referred as an "it" or "thing" by Nelly and as the "imp of satan", by the rest of the ...view middle of the document...

Nelly began to warm up to him when the children got the measles and he appreciated her care and didn't whine, it gave her a sense of accomplishment when she realized that if it weren't for her Heathcliff would have died. Hindley continued to resent Heathcliff because his father grew to like and treat Heathcliff more favourably than himself.Heathcliff held a good understanding of the line of power within the Earnshaw house hold, Heathcliff held a great deal of power within the household and over Hindley through manipulation. When Hindley physically abused Heathcliff, he was able to use this against him by threatening to tell his father, who would fully support Heathcliff. Heathcliff used this power to issolate Hindley from the rest of the family. Heathcliff withstood all of Hindley's abuse, "he would stand Hindley's blows without winking or shedding a tear." Heathcliff was obviously hardened, Nelly Dean suggested due to ill treatment. His brute physical strength was apparent when he withstood the "iron weight, used for weighing potatoes and hay" that Hindley throws at him for taking his horse. Although the Heathcliff we see here is presented as being tough and steadfast, we see another softer, more sensitive side of him when he lies softly on Catherine's lap as Mr. Earnshaw slipped closer to death. When Mr. Earnshaw passed away, Hindley callously kept Catherine and Heathcliff apart, this was the only punishment that would stab directly into the heart of the two children.Nelly Dean describes Catherine on page 42,"Certainly, she had ways with her such as I never saw a child take up before; and she put all of us past our patience fifty times and oftener in a day from the hour she came down stairs, till the hour she went to bed, we had not a minute's security that she wouldn't be in mischief. Her spirits were always at high-water mark, her tongue always going - singing, laughing, and plaguing everybody who would not do the same...I believe she meant no harm; for once she made you cry in good earnest, it seldom happened that she would not keep you company, and oblige you to be quiet that you might comfort her."Cathy also held a great deal of power with in the household. The majority of her power was over Heathcliff, "the boy would do her bidding in anything, and his only when it suited his own inclination." Cathy also stood up to her father and rarely did what she was told, often the oposite just to spite him, Although she would be the first to apologive for any wrong doing, and also would be the first to forgive.When Mr. Earnshaw died and Hindley came back to rule over Wuthering Heights the dynamic of Catherine's and Heathcliff's relationship changed as Hindley seeked revenge on Heathcliff. Hindley lowered...

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