Destructive Relationships Exposed In Wuthering Heights, By Emily Bronte

614 words - 2 pages

Many prominent authors of the Victorian era have fashioned gothic tales with certain levels of morality. Wuthering Heights, by Emily Bronte, also included a sense of spiritual reassessment, or moral reconciliation. Such a moral reassessment is strongly evident by the events involving Heathcliff, Catherine, Hareton, and Cathy as portrayed by Bronte’s intent to warn readers of the destructive elements a relationship may have through moral reconciliation and essential realization.
Bronte begins to build upon her intent through the turmoil and pain of Heathcliff and Catherine’s generation, because it is in this time period that the characters are set up to live the remorseful lives that they must later reevaluate. But such repenting lives were due to the mistakes they both committed. Heathcliff’s nature alone is a stellar example. Had he been a softer gentleman like Edgar, he may have had a chance to marry her; thus, Edgar was the more deserving candidate of her love. Catherine too commits her mistake, though in oblivion, by even deciding to love two men while being married to one. In the next generation characters, Hareton and Cathy make up for such foolishness; Hareton, unlike Heathcliff, lacks any motive of vehemence or revenge, thus making up for the mistake of Heathcliff’s brutality. Meanwhile, Cathy is definite to love only one man at a time, unlike her mother, demonstrating a reconciliation of the previous generation’s mistakes as well. This is evident when she loved Linton alone. Not until long after his death did she fall in love with another person, and when she did, it was Hareton. Both deserved to marry one another because they made up for their previous generation’s mistakes. Thus, through this reconciliation, they deserved to be married without any interference of Heathcliff.
The deserving factor was...

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