Comparison Of The Tempest And Translations

790 words - 3 pages

Comparison of The Tempest and Translations

‘The Tempest’ begins with a enormous storm and signifies a great
change for the people of the island, but we do not learn until later
on in the play that it is Prospero who has caused the storm so that
the characters on the ship will be brought to the island. The opening
scene is very dramatic and shows the inner turmoil and change that
will occur for the characters involved, whereas it is also quite
confusing for the audience as we are not aware of what significance
the storm has, and what has caused it until later. Characters run
frantically about in this scene and we are unaware of their purpose;
the audience is not communicated well at the beginning as we are left
uninformed of the situation. Just as in ‘Translations’ where there is
also a lack of communication as Manus is trying to get Sarah to talk
but as she is unable to talk she cannot express her feelings and
thought to him clearly and so the communication between the two has
been broken. Manus says, “Soon you’ll be telling me all the secrets
that have been in that head of yours all these years”.

When Prospero tells Miranda the story of where he came from and how he
used to be the Duke of Milan but was usurped by his brother, he asks
Miranda if she is listening properly to make sure there would be no
broken communication between the two of them. He says, “I pray thee,
mark me” and “Dost thou hear?” But Prospero does not communicate well
and sometimes talks nonsense so that it is hard to understand what he
means. Prospero explains that he gradually grew uninterested in ruling
his kingdom and turned his attention more and more to his studies and
books, neglecting his duties as duke. As he did not communicate as
well with his subjects and got lost in his books and the power they
gave him, this gave his brother Antonio the opportunity to usurp him.
He said, “I, thus neglecting worldly ends, all dedicated to closeness
and the bettering of my mind.” There is also a sense of Broken
communication when the English are translating the Irish place names
in ‘Translations. Owen translates Lancey’s orders but does not
translate them correctly so everyone becomes confused at what Lancey
wants.

Owen says, “Did I make a mess of it?”

Manus says, “You weren’t saying what Lancey was saying!”

In ‘Translations’ Yolland and Maire share an intimate moment having
left the dance. They...

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