Comparing Colonial Virginia And Colonial New England's Effect On American Character

648 words - 3 pages

I believe colonial New England had more of an effect on the American character than Virginia for several reasons. First they promoted more of the values that have transcended into modern day America such as religious toleration, their educational ideas and their focus on the importance of family. And we shouldn’t forget the fact that the American Revolution began in New England so in essence the America we know today would not exist without New England.

First off, colonial New England was more family based, as I believe America is today. When immigrants landed in New England they brought with them their families, expecting this place to become their permanent place of residence. Therefore their communities were more tight nit and more concerned with the promotion of values that would benefit the community as a whole. Whereas the Virginia colonies brought in more business oriented tobacco farmers who would establish communities in areas based on the Agricultural value of the land, therefore these communities were more focused on money, profit, and expansion rather than the betterment of the lives of the citizens. Therefore I believe colonial New England was more of a reflection of modern day America in their focus on families.

Second, the New England colonies were founded by many who were seeking religious freedom, therefore the New England colonies were more open minded regarding religion. For instance, the first religious toleration act was passed in Maryland in 1649 by the by the assembly of the Province of Maryland. This act mandated religious toleration. Rhode Island was also seen as a colony of free thinkers and a place for religious toleration. So there was simply a lot of diversity in New England, the vast majority were Protestant Christians however there were significant numbers of Roman Catholics in Maryland and Delaware, as well as a small amount...

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