Accepting Fate Essay

2196 words - 9 pages

Never Let Me Go is a mysterious story to the reader at first, but as they begin to get more in-depth, find out it’s more than one could think. Kazuo Ishiguro’s vivid imagination reflects well into his book Never Let Me Go, as the book explores one’s own morality into real life as they read it. Kazuo Ishiguro reflects the ideas of Post-Modernism and his own life and imagination through Never Let Me Go, which explores the morality of humans and their fate.

On November 8, 1954 Kazuo Ishiguro was born, his father Shizuo and his mother Shizuko. (R.C.) Born in Nagasaki, Kazuo moved to Britain in 1960. (R.C.) Shizuo, Kazuo’s father, an oceanographer was offered by the British government a job. (R.C.) The job offered being exploration of the North Sea oil fields (R.C.) Shizuo took the offer and moved the family to Guildford. (R.C.) The family initially thought the movement would be temporary. (R.C.) They soon after found many reasons to stay in Britain, as Shizuo loved the fact there was a lack of social obligation in the country. (R.C.) Ishiguro’s family decided to stay in Britain, himself and his sisters immersed in British culture. (R.C.)
Kazuo Ishiguro went to a typical British school, soon finding himself fully integrated. (R.C.) Kazuo Ishiguro read classic nineteenth literature, like Charles Dickens and Charlotte Brontë. (R.C.) Kazuo also grew up with other influential European writers such as Anton Chekhov, a Russian dramatist. (R.C.) Kazuo Ishiguro still retains ties to Japan. (R.C.) Through childhood memories, 1950’s Japanese films, and Japanese books Kazuo Ishiguro retained a vision of Japan. (R.C.) His family regularly conversed in Japanese. (R.C.) Ishiguro has a strong interested in Japanese films that portray its past, which has given a strong influence to Ishiguro, which he acknowledges. (R.C.)
After graduating from high school in the 1970’s, Kazuo Ishiguro began to travel around, and taking a variety of odd jobs. (R.C.) Kazuo Ishiguro set out to different counties, such as Canada and the United States, taking hints from his British peers. (R.C.) Ishiguro did not feel any need to visit his homeland Japan during his travels. (R.C.) Kazuo felt as though he was still connected through his imagination to Japan. (R.C.)
Kazuo Ishiguro took an odd job as being the grouse beater for the Queen Mother of Balmoral Castle in 1973. (R.C.) Kazuo also was employed as a social worker before and after he received his Bachelor of Arts. (R.C.) Kazuo Ishiguro received his Bachelor of Arts in English and in philosophy from the University of Kent in 1978. (R.C.) At the age of twenty-five, Kazuo Ishiguro decided to try his hand at writing. (R.C.) Kazuo had an unsuccessful carrier at singing and as a lyric writer. Kazuo Ishiguro enrolled in University of East Anglia in a creative writing program in 1979. (R.C.) Kazuo Ishiguro received his Master of Arts in 1980 from University of East Anglia. (R.C.)
Kazuo Ishiguro began to write short fictional stories...

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